About this Website

Welcome to After Psychotherapy, an online mental health resource for those who may have begun their journey of self-discovery during psychotherapy and want to continue along that road now that their treatment has ended. As any good therapist would do, the posts here aim to bring you closer to those parts of yourself outside of awareness: emotions you’d rather deny or avoid, conflicts you’d prefer not to confront. The opinions and guidance offered here are no substitute for psychotherapy, however; if you find that you need to consult a professional, you might want to read my post on “Choosing a Therapist” first, by clicking on this link.

For information about the site’s author, Joseph Burgo, click here.

Contact

PRESS CONTACT ONLY:

Sharon Bially, (508) 655-2676
sharon@booksavvypr.com

LITERARY AGENT:

Gillian MacKenzie
gmackenzie@gillianmackenzieagency.com

FILM & TELEVISION:

Michael Eha & Associates
michaeleha1&gmail.com

INQUIRIES MEANT FOR DR. BURGO SHOULD BE SENT TO HIM DIRECTLY AT: afterpsy@gmail.com

Because the volume of site visits has grown so dramatically and I now receive daily appeals for advice, I’m no longer able to provide this service free of charge. To reply to an email that asks for answers to simple questions set forth in a paragraph or two, I now charge $20, payable in advance; payment can be made via PayPal using this email address: afterpsy@gmail.com. If you would like my professional response to a detailed account of your situation, I charge $50.

If you’re interested in psychotherapy via Skype, please read all of the material to be found here, including the Disclosure Statement.

About Narcissistic Personality Disorder

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV, the following are the essential features of Narcissistic Personality Disorder:

A pervasive pattern of grandiosity (in fantasy or behavior), need for admiration, and lack of empathy, beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts, as indicated by five (or more) of the following:

(1)  has a grandiose sense of self-importance (e.g., exaggerates achievements and talents, expects to be recognized as superior without commensurate achievements)

(2)  is preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance, beauty, or ideal love

(3)  believes that he or she is “special” and unique and can only be understood by, or should associate with, other special or high-status people (or institutions)

To continue reading, click here.

About Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks.  Symptoms of bipolar disorder are severe. They are different from the normal ups and downs that everyone goes through from time to time. Bipolar disorder symptoms can result in damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide. But bipolar disorder can be treated, and people with this illness can lead full and productive lives.

Bipolar disorder often develops in a person’s late teens or early adult years. At least half of all cases start before age 25.1 Some people have their first symptoms during childhood, while others may develop symptoms late in life.

Bipolar disorder is not easy to spot when it starts. The symptoms may seem like separate problems, not recognized as parts of a larger problem. Some people suffer for years before they are properly diagnosed and treated. Like diabetes or heart disease, bipolar disorder is a long-term illness that must be carefully managed throughout a person’s life.

To continue reading, click here.

About Autism

From the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition

A. Qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:

1. marked impairments in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body postures, and gestures to regulate social interaction

2. failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level

3. a lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people (e.g. by a lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest to other people)

4. lack of social or emotional reciprocity

B. Restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, and activities, as manifested by at least one of the following:

1. encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus

2. apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals

3. stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g., hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)

4. persistent preoccupation with parts of objects

C. The disturbance causes clinically significant impairments in social, occupational, or other important